Is YOUR Court or Organization a High Performing One?

A group of court colleagues is currently developing information about “high performing” courts to provide underlying concepts with practical applications.  We are requesting your response. Is YOUR court a high performing court? What did you (or others) do to make it “high performing?” What does that mean to your organization?  What made the court or organization “high performing?” And, more importantly, what was the outcome? We are interested in hearing your experiences and results.

The National Center for State Courts has described a “high performing” court as one that:

  • uses administrative principals and processes to gain operational excellence and implement improvements;
  • understands and leverages the organizational culture;
  • uses performance measures to assess operations; and
  • conducts ongoing steps to improve performance.

(Further information about “high performing courts” can be found on the National Center for State Courts website at www.ncsc.org )

Webster’s Dictionary indicates that “high performance” means better, faster and more efficient than others.  In the court environment, what does that mean?

One thought on “A Court Leadership Question For You…

  1. Janet, we are not currently considered a high performance court. We are in the process of becoming so. We recently implemented court performance measures (courtools) into our state court statistical reporting model. We are hopeful these measures will help judges and administrators become more familiar with their caseflow management practices that impact their age of active pending cases and times to disposition. This is a way we are 3 of the 4 bullet points you listed as what a high performing court is. The ICM courses being implemented in the state of Nevada will hopefully help with the one point we have not yet satisfied.

    Best Wishes

    Like

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