Court Leader’s Advantage – Artificial Intelligence: What You Need to Know Now

Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) has already brought us general business tools that courts can use to assist in automating work, analyzing documents, and conducting legal analysis. As a start, courts will need to put their information into an electronic format that can be used by A.I. tools. They will also need to re-engineer their business practices. … Continue reading Court Leader’s Advantage – Artificial Intelligence: What You Need to Know Now

Court Leader’s Advantage – What Hurricane Florence Can Teach Us

Last fall Hurricane Florence devastated the state of North Carolina's families, communities, and its trial courts. Court administrators Ellen Hancox and Caitlin Emmons discuss how they made it through the storm, took care of their families, and helped manage to keep their courts afloat. What lessons can we take away from their experience? What did … Continue reading Court Leader’s Advantage – What Hurricane Florence Can Teach Us

Using Artificial Intelligence and Big Data to Develop Tools Used in Courts

Administrator's note:  This is an updated version of an article previously published to Court Leader on July 21, 2018. (1) Significant attention is now being focused on developing tools to assist people in navigating legal processes, resolving legal disputes, and making legal decisions. Using artificial intelligence (AI) to analyze relevant datasets could greatly increase the … Continue reading Using Artificial Intelligence and Big Data to Develop Tools Used in Courts

The 2018 NACM Annual Conference in Atlanta: Ethics and Active Engagement

The sessions on Monday, presented by the Hon. Susan Sabers, Karl Thoennes III, and Peter C. Kiefer, featured lively discussions as audience members role-played various characters in two scenarios and the entire audience voted on the ethics of the drama using the electronic voting method PollEverywhere. Tell Me Something I Don’t Know About Courts and … Continue reading The 2018 NACM Annual Conference in Atlanta: Ethics and Active Engagement